Comments for Am I wasting my time?

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May 07, 2018
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Thanks for Replies!
by: Michael

Thank you everybody for your replies and great advice! I am sorry it took me so long to respond back.

I have been frustrated by the situation. I usually like to immerse myself in my interests, and my schedule has kept me from diving into Kendo like I would like. I suppose learning to be patient and consistent is just one of the many things Kendo has to teach me!

Imafuji Sensei nailed it when he said "watch and learn" is the best way to study Kendo. I grew up playing baseball, and got lots of verbal feedback about my form. I am used to having people correct my weight distribution, hip alignment, finger placement, etc. That's how I learned how to hit baseballs, and I think I'm just craving that type of instruction again. In Kendo, my instructor has very little to say about form, and seems to teach through demonstration and imitation, which can be frustrating. Again, it is a good thing for me to learn patience.

Thank you for your advice and encouragement! I have no desire to win tournaments or medals, I just want the chance to study a martial art and discipline myself. I suppose letting go of my ego and what makes me comfortable is the first lesson Kendo has to teach me. I will keep training and learn to 'enjoy the flavor' of Kendo!

Apr 25, 2018
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In reply to all the comments
by: Kendo-Guide.Com

Great advice! Thank you!!

Apr 24, 2018
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Feeling no regret
by: 根本英俊

As a Chinese proverb goes well,slow progress is better than none. Keep going and you won't regret.

Apr 24, 2018
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Keep at it and try to be patient.
by: Tristan Hann

Kendo is about the journey more than being about a destination.Its in continuing that you will find a benefit to your life through Kendo. I would encourage you to stick with it and be patient. Many Kendoka experience interuptions and delays in their training...sometimes for years at a time. If you enjoy it just do what you can when you can and stay involved with the kendo community and your dojo as and when you can. Good luck !

Apr 24, 2018
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Kendō 's flavour
by: André Luiz

Kendō will never be "waist of time" if the practitioner becomes a better person theough Kendō, no matter the skill level he/she eventually achieve!
Everything in this world has its particular 'flavour'! Kendō has flavour too! I think Michael should relax, take his time, and enjoy the umique flavour of Kendō! (now he's trying to "swallow" too fast!...)
Ah! Share a beer with Kendō mates after keiko will help to taste! ;)

Apr 24, 2018
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How you train matters.
by: Andrew

From my personal experience of 10 years I`ve experienced many issues affecting my frequency of practice. I will have gaps in my training whether it be months due to too injuries, weeks due to heavy workload, or days when I need to meet deadlines.

My sensei has often told me it is not the frequency of practice that is important but the quality of practice. I have often seen new students doing the same thing over and over again day after day with barely any improvement. Yet some are able to excel going to less practices. Frequency will contribute but it isn't the key factor.

From my experience, improvement comes with a maturity of understanding our weaknesses and determining solutions. For example, new students will require repetition to practice swings or footwork. If one is unable to frequently practice at and dojo, it is possible to practice at home provided one is self aware of what proper basics are.

My advice to make the most of practice are:
A) walk into the dojo with clear goals (2 to 3; ie work on kote, or remember proper zanshin)
B) practice movements without shinai when possible to understand the technique if you have limited space at home
C) express your concerns to sensei to see if they can supplement training in the dojo with books or a home training regiment.

If you are motivated to continue practicing and training there are ways to overcome the limitations of a busy schedule. Forums like Imafuji sensei`s are a great way to seek advice. I hope this helps.

Apr 24, 2018
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Definition
by: Michael Lindsay

This entirely depends on what you determine to be a waste of time. Do you have a deadline for improvement? If not, you can be satisfied to move at your own pace. This requires a degree of humility and understanding on your part.

Two times a month is fine if that's all you can make for a normal enthusiast with no goals to win a major tournament. If you are satisfied with enjoying the activity for your own reasons, you need not worry about wasting your time.

If you have a separate goal besides general improvement in Kendo, your position might be different. No single timeline applies to hobbiests just out to enjoy an incredible martial art just as it is.

I will also speak freely and say your post suggests a degree of frustration. It might help to keep the perspective that pursuing Kendo is a personal thing—ultimately you answer to no one for your own practice but yourself. I realize that may sound like heresy, but it's true.

Best of luck. If you give up, it's you giving up. If you stick with it, same thing.

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