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Slight Disk Herniation at c4-c5 and Kendo

by Kendogeek
(Abu Dhabi, UAE)

I had been diagnosed with a slight disc herniation at c4 c5. I had been enthusiastic with Kendo and dream of reaching at least 5th dan in my lifetime (I’m 27) and I had been practicing for 2 months then my surgeon told me to stop Kendo for a month.


My question is, does a men strike or a failed men strike may affect my neck problem? I’m curious about how heavy is a men strike is so that I can relate it with my physician on my next visit. Please, I need your kind answers.

Do you think I can still practice Kendo? It’s like an agony for me each time I miss a Kendo keiko.

Answer: Thank you for your question. It is hard for me to give you how heavy a men strike is in numbers since I have no data about that. I hope someone else has some data.

I will tell you what I always tell students. When you have injuries, you should stop for a while and concentrate on fixing.

I am sensing that you want to train kendō for the rest of your life and probably to improve yourself as a human being. So you should see it as long term training rather than satisfying your desire to do kendō (physical training).

Many people do kendō with physical injuries. The important thing is that you know when to stop and your training mates should know that you have a serious problem in your neck.

But there are a lot of times that you train with people who don’t know about your injury. You have two choices; tell them you have a neck problem so they will do no crazy things to hurt you or you train with them until you think you should stop.

I had a sensei who had an operation in his neck and he told me the truth before training. I was very young (striking a lot and fast) but he was over 60. He did not want me to come at him like I always did because his neck could not take it.

But a disadvantage of telling your opponent is that your opponent cannot fight you with 100% of his/her ability.

So you must talk to your physician and go through physio-therapy so you can train kendō without worrying about getting hurt more. This is also important for your opponents.

No one wants to get hurt and no one hurts others (basically).

Hope this helps.

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Apr 07, 2012
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Wisdom training....age teaches us asking or not...
by: Anonymous

I've done some kendo in the past, but have not reached even a shodan. But, instead, I've done a lot of ocean paddling and Karate, since teenager. Well, today I am 36 and I have 3 medium-big herniation in the cervical, plus one in the lumbar, as many osteophytosis in the collum.

I still practice Karate, and I am getting worried as those problems are getting worse as the time is passing, more and more pain as the year goes by. So now I am beginning to think again about my Karate practice, as I want (and need) to do it for the rest of my life...

It is not easy to accept a discal herniation problem as it is a degenerative problem, and will get worse with the age.

You are young, but very smart to pay attention to this problem now. By doing this and taking your limitations seriously, I am confident that you'll able to practice your kendo forever. Keep your full energy training for the examinations, and train always remembering you limitation.

Least, but maybe most important: look for an exercise program to protect your collum (also your lumbar), and look after information about Condroitin and glucosamine supplement with your doctor.

Good trainings!

Kendo-Guide.Com: Thank you for sharing your experience and info!


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